Agrodome Rotorua (New Zealand)

During the first week of our stay in Rotorua, New Zealand, we went around exploring natural geysers, crater lakes, multi-colored sulphur springs, bubbling mud pools and even experienced the Maori (Tribal) culture and traditions. We even did our share of watching New Zealand’s national bird, Kiwi and the living pre-historic fossil, the Tuatara, the World’s slowest growing and the longest living reptile.  Then it was time to take a look at the other treasures that the city had to offer.

After all these it was time for us to visit New Zealand’s next most loved attraction after the thermal wonders, the Agrodome. What a fun filled place it was and we never realized how much time we had spent there. It all started with the sheep show where we went inside a huge auditorium that looked like a log cabin from outside. Inside had a typical stink that one would experience in a farm and at corners of the auditorium were kept some plump Rams with perfectly rounded horns and totally covered with wool. As we took our seats, the presenter came up on the stage and so did 19 breeds of sheep from around the world.

13zs80k.jpgers of the auditorium were kept some plump Rams with perfectly rounded horns and totally covered with wool. As we took our seats, the presenter came up on the stage and so did 19 breeds of sheep from around the world. We spotted the Indian one Merino which we thought was super cute. After giving us an introduction about New Zealand’s farming, the huntaway and the heading dogs that control the herds were brought in. Amazing was the efficiency and the affection of those ferocious dogs that were in charge of the sheep. After a loud round of applause for the dogs, it was time for shearing. The audiences were asked to choose one sheep to be sheared and I prayed so that no one selects the Merino…I wanted to bring it back home…so cuddly it was. Ultimately the presenter picked up one and sheared all the wool off with an electric razor and pacified some protesting audience when he declared that it was very common and the wool would grow back on it again, that’s why it was called farming. The hilarious part followed after that when a cow walked onto the stage and once again the presenter called out for volunteers who would like to milk the cow. I mischievously glanced at my daughter and got back a cold stare and a ‘hell NO.’ But someone did go up the stage and milked the cow and guess what, even got a certificate of ‘udderance’ for doing it successfully.  This was followed by a flock of lambs that strolled onto the stage and a group of enthusiast kids jumped up on the stage with milk bottles to feed those babies…aww, what an adorable sight it was. I wanted to carry one and cuddle, so soft those looked.  After doing our bit of shopping from the souvenir shop there, we came out to see the sheared sheep merrily playing in the field with the dogs

(Sheep Show)

35kr47o.jpgitorium that looked like a log cabin from outside. Inside had a typical stink that one would experience in a farm and at corners of the auditorium were kept some plump Rams with perfectly rounded horns and totally covered with wool. As we took our seats, the presenter came up on the stage and so did 19 breeds of sheep from around the world. We spotted the Indian one Merino which we thought was super cute. After giving us an introduction about New Zealand’s farming, the huntaway and the heading dogs that control the herds were brought in. Amazing was the efficiency and the affection of those ferocious dogs that were in charge of the sheep. After a loud round of applause for the dogs, it was time for shearing. The audiences were asked to choose one sheep to be sheared and I prayed so that no one selects the Merino…I wanted to bring it back home…so cuddly it was. Ultimately the presenter picked up one and sheared all the wool off with an electric razor and pacified some protesting audience when he declared that it was very common and the wool would grow back on it again, that’s why it was called farming. The hilarious part followed after that when a cow walked onto the stage and once again the presenter called out for volunteers who would like to milk the cow. I mischievously glanced at my daughter and got back a cold stare and a ‘hell NO.’ But someone did go up the stage and milked the cow and guess what, even got a certificate of ‘udderance’ for doing it successfully.  This was followed by a flock of lambs that strolled onto the stage and a group of enthusiast kids jumped up on the stage with milk bottles to feed those babies…aww, what an adorable sight it was. I wanted to carry one and cuddle, so soft those looked.  After doing our bit of shopping from the souvenir shop there, we came out to see the sheared sheep merrily playing in the field with the dogs

(Sheep Shearing)

We spotted the Indian one Merino which we thought was super cute. After giving us an introduction about New Zealand’s farming, the huntaway and the heading dogs that control the herds were brought in. Amazing was the efficiency and the affection of those ferocious dogs that were in charge of the sheep. After a loud round of applause for the dogs, it was time for shearing. The audiences were asked to choose one sheep to be sheared and I prayed so that no one selects the Merino…I wanted to bring it back home…so cuddly it was. Ultimately the presenter picked up one and sheared all the wool off with an electric razor and pacified some protesting audience when he declared that it was very common and the wool would grow back on it again, that’s why it was called farming.

cntk4.jpgorns and totally covered with wool. As we took our seats, the presenter came up on the stage and so did 19 breeds of sheep from around the world. We spotted the Indian one Merino which we thought was super cute. After giving us an introduction about New Zealand’s farming, the huntaway and the heading dogs that control the herds were brought in. Amazing was the efficiency and the affection of those ferocious dogs that were in charge of the sheep. After a loud round of applause for the dogs, it was time for shearing. The audiences were asked to choose one sheep to be sheared and I prayed so that no one selects the Merino…I wanted to bring it back home…so cuddly it was. Ultimately the presenter picked up one and sheared all the wool off with an electric razor and pacified some protesting audience when he declared that it was very common and the wool would grow back on it again, that’s why it was called farming. The hilarious part followed after that when a cow walked onto the stage and once again the presenter called out for volunteers who would like to milk the cow. I mischievously glanced at my daughter and got back a cold stare and a ‘hell NO.’ But someone did go up the stage and milked the cow and guess what, even got a certificate of ‘udderance’ for doing it successfully.  This was followed by a flock of lambs that strolled onto the stage and a group of enthusiast kids jumped up on the stage with milk bottles to feed those babies…aww, what an adorable sight it was. I wanted to carry one and cuddle, so soft those looked.  After doing our bit of shopping from the souvenir shop there, we came out to see the sheared sheep merrily playing in the field with the dogs

(Invitation to milk the cow)

6q8rqq.jpgly covered with wool. As we took our seats, the presenter came up on the stage and so did 19 breeds of sheep from around the world. We spotted the Indian one Merino which we thought was super cute. After giving us an introduction about New Zealand’s farming, the huntaway and the heading dogs that control the herds were brought in. Amazing was the efficiency and the affection of those ferocious dogs that were in charge of the sheep. After a loud round of applause for the dogs, it was time for shearing. The audiences were asked to choose one sheep to be sheared and I prayed so that no one selects the Merino…I wanted to bring it back home…so cuddly it was. Ultimately the presenter picked up one and sheared all the wool off with an electric razor and pacified some protesting audience when he declared that it was very common and the wool would grow back on it again, that’s why it was called farming. The hilarious part followed after that when a cow walked onto the stage and once again the presenter called out for volunteers who would like to milk the cow. I mischievously glanced at my daughter and got back a cold stare and a ‘hell NO.’ But someone did go up the stage and milked the cow and guess what, even got a certificate of ‘udderance’ for doing it successfully.  This was followed by a flock of lambs that strolled onto the stage and a group of enthusiast kids jumped up on the stage with milk bottles to feed those babies…aww, what an adorable sight it was. I wanted to carry one and cuddle, so soft those looked.  After doing our bit of shopping from the souvenir shop there, we came out to see the sheared sheep merrily playing in the field with the dogs

(Feeding the lambs)

25zihk0.jpgool. As we took our seats, the presenter came up on the stage and so did 19 breeds of sheep from around the world. We spotted the Indian one Merino which we thought was super cute. After giving us an introduction about New Zealand’s farming, the huntaway and the heading dogs that control the herds were brought in. Amazing was the efficiency and the affection of those ferocious dogs that were in charge of the sheep. After a loud round of applause for the dogs, it was time for shearing. The audiences were asked to choose one sheep to be sheared and I prayed so that no one selects the Merino…I wanted to bring it back home…so cuddly it was. Ultimately the presenter picked up one and sheared all the wool off with an electric razor and pacified some protesting audience when he declared that it was very common and the wool would grow back on it again, that’s why it was called farming. The hilarious part followed after that when a cow walked onto the stage and once again the presenter called out for volunteers who would like to milk the cow. I mischievously glanced at my daughter and got back a cold stare and a ‘hell NO.’ But someone did go up the stage and milked the cow and guess what, even got a certificate of ‘udderance’ for doing it successfully.  This was followed by a flock of lambs that strolled onto the stage and a group of enthusiast kids jumped up on the stage with milk bottles to feed those babies…aww, what an adorable sight it was. I wanted to carry one and cuddle, so soft those looked.  After doing our bit of shopping from the souvenir shop there, we came out to see the sheared sheep merrily playing in the field with the dogs

(Certificate)

The hilarious part followed after that when a cow walked onto the stage and once again the presenter called out for volunteers who would like to milk the cow. I mischievously glanced at my daughter and got back a cold stare and a ‘hell NO.’ But someone did go up the stage and milked the cow and guess what, even got a certificate of ‘udderance’ for doing it successfully.This was followed by a flock of lambs that strolled onto the stage and a group of enthusiast kids jumped up on the stage with milk bottles to feed those babies…aww, what an adorable sight it was. I wanted to carry one and cuddle, so soft those looked.

After doing our bit of shopping from the souvenir shop there, we came out to see the sheared sheep merrily playing in the field with the dogs.Returning to our hotel later, we poured onto brochures to see what else was left to be explored and then went off to sleep with a happy mind expecting another day of fun filled activities in the thermal capital of New Zealand.

2nrjzu9.jpge. It all started with the sheep show where we went inside a huge auditorium that looked like a log cabin from outside. Inside had a typical stink that one would experience in a farm and at corners of the auditorium were kept some plump Rams with perfectly rounded horns and totally covered with wool. As we took our seats, the presenter came up on the stage and so did 19 breeds of sheep from around the world. We spotted the Indian one Merino which we thought was super cute. After giving us an introduction about New Zealand’s farming, the huntaway and the heading dogs that control the herds were brought in. Amazing was the efficiency and the affection of those ferocious dogs that were in charge of the sheep. After a loud round of applause for the dogs, it was time for shearing. The audiences were asked to choose one sheep to be sheared and I prayed so that no one selects the Merino…I wanted to bring it back home…so cuddly it was. Ultimately the presenter picked up one and sheared all the wool off with an electric razor and pacified some protesting audience when he declared that it was very common and the wool would grow back on it again, that’s why it was called farming. The hilarious part followed after that when a cow walked onto the stage and once again the presenter called out for volunteers who would like to milk the cow. I mischievously glanced at my daughter and got back a cold stare and a ‘hell NO.’ But someone did go up the stage and milked the cow and guess what, even got a certificate of ‘udderance’ for doing it successfully.  This was followed by a flock of lambs that strolled onto the stage and a group of enthusiast kids jumped up on the stage with milk bottles to feed those babies…aww, what an adorable sight it was. I wanted to carry one and cuddle, so soft those looked.  After doing our bit of shopping from the souvenir shop there, we came out to see the sheared sheep merrily playing in the field with the dogs

(Playing in the field)