Review - Travel & Tourism

Durga Puja 2011- The United States of America

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Bengalis are there all over the World and it is said that wherever there are 3 Bengali families, there has to be a Durga Puja. Well, may not be quite true but the fact that Durga Puja is ‘Sarvajanin’ i.e. for everyone, Bengalis try to start a Puja whenever there is enough number of enthusiasts. Calcutta has the cream of Pujas but this feature is about the Pujas that are held in United States, organized by the NRIs. 

A big Thank You to all the Puja Committees & friends around the United States for sending in the best photos :-)



Durga Puja 2011--Rest of India

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Bengalis are there all over the World and it is said that wherever there are 3 Bengali families, there has to be a Durga Puja. Well, may not be quite true but the fact that Durga Puja is ‘Sarvajanin’ i.e. for everyone, Bengalis try to start a Puja whenever there is enough number of enthusiasts. Calcutta has the cream of Pujas but this feature is about the Pujas that are held in other parts of India, New Delhi to start with. Will keep this updating as and when the photos start pouring in. 


Pujo Special Snacks: Mughlai Paratha

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It is Durga Puja time everywhere in the World and no Puja can be complete without the delicacies of Bengal. Starting from Rolls, to Phuchka, Jhalmuri, it’s also time for Indian Chinese, Mughlai Parathas and the all time favorite Calcutta Style Biryani.
For people like us who are far away from home in India, finding a road side stall selling these mouth-watering delicacies is just unthinkable. So most of us, try and make a Pujo like ambience at home by making some of these at home. The most popular snack that can be made at home is no doubt the Mughlai Paratha.

Gornergrat (Switzerland)

Gornergrat was a wonderful snowy vista that probably the best view of the big rock, The Matterhorn. Since Gornergrat is accessible from Zermatt, one fine Swiss summer morning we reached Zermatt...

Travelogue: Dancing to the Gypsy Guitar in GRANADA - By Rashmi Gowda (WBRi Online Magazine)

Granada was indeed a revelation, and we were really glad we had come. You may visit a place and enjoy its architectural beauty and history, but mixing with the people always makes for the best experiences and memories.

Travelogue

GRANADA, Spain

by Rashmi Gowda

Reshmi GowdaEditor's note: Rashmi Gowda works for a medical device company in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. She grew up in South India, and moved to the US to pursue her MBA. She has been writing short stories, poems and travelogues for her blog rushwrites.blogspot.com and also worked as co-editor for her school's weekly magazine. She can be reached at rashmi.gowda [at] gmail [dot] com.

Granada, May 4, 2011: Aric, the walking tour guide pointed us to La Buleria, if we wanted to listen to flamenco music. The bar was owned by a flamenco legend’s family (Paco de Lucia’s nephew’s family, but I could be wrong), and although there were no scheduled performances, all flamenco artists congregated there after their performances elsewhere, and just jammed. Traditionally, this is how flamenco evolved, with people congregating in café cantentes ortablaos, not with shows or set pieces as it is showcased now. He suggested we go around 1 AM. We got there around 12, a bit too early, there was hardly anyone. The bar itself stocked only hard liquor, and there was a cave like place inside, where about 15 chairs were set in a circle with the backs to the wall. The walls were white, with a very uneven surface, and there were pictures of flamenco artists on the wall. The sound system was playing Camarón de la Isla. I asked if they could put on Orobroy by Dorantes, a song I hadn’t heard since I got to Spain, and one that I missed. The dark haired guy at the bar was dressed entirely in black and said he didn’t have the song. All communication was in Spanish and given my limited grasp of the language, involved a lot of sign language as well. The drinks were a bit too strong for our liking. The martinis that Neeto and Attu ordered were composed largely of vermouth, and a little bit of gin that had to be asked for. My vodka was unwatered down as well, as we realized much later than I could have asked for lime with it.

There was a couple that was already sitting when we arrived. A man in a blue shirt, with hair tied into a pony tail, and a beautiful woman with a camera in hand. One of the men at the bar brought in his guitar, and played us a song strumming along with the guitar and singing in a deep throated voice. After he was done Neeto asked if we could record a song with our cameras, and were told we could, only for a bit. I went to get Neeto a beer.



Zermatt (Switzerland)


Michigan, March 25, 2011 (Washington Bangla Radio): When our travel advisor showed me the brochures of Zermatt, the captivating pictures of Klein Matterhorn made it feel absolutely irresistible. 


Prayers for Japan II (Tokyo)


Michigan, March 22, 2011 (Washington Bangla Radio): The strict self discipline and Japan’s hi tech infrastructure has prevented Tokyo from being affected by the recent earthquake and the Tsunami. I fondly recall my trip to this amazing city of Asia that can attract anyone from any corner of the World, even though sightseeing is not its USP.


Jungle Book (Kanha, India)


Michigan, March 21, 2011 (Washington Bangla Radio): When Rudyard Kipling penned his famous ‘Jungle book’ inspired by Kanha, the verdant yet dense forest with teeming wild life wasn’t as famous as it is now.


Stone Mountain Park (Atlanta, United States)


Michigan, March 15, 2011 (Washington Bangla Radio): Georgia’s Stone Mountain Park is the region’s most visited attraction, a patch of green and is home to the world’s largest piece of exposed granite. Offering a variety of entertainment and recreation for visitors of all ages, we found that there was always something happening at the Stone Mountain Park. 


Prayers for Japan (Miyajima)


Michigan, March 12, 2011 (Washington Bangla Radio): Japan, as a nation is just beautiful. Hi tech affairs are a child’s play in this nation and we realized it more when we covered a distance of 900 kms to Hiroshima & Miyajima by Japan’s famed ‘Bullet Train’ in less than four hours flat…phew!! 


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